Collection: Gerd Borchgrevink

Gerd Borchgrevink is an artist with more than 30 years of experience as a photojournalist, painter and art director. Borchgrevink is educated at Westerdals Oslo School of Arts and Communication in Oslo and has participated in 17 individual and collective exhibitions in various art associations and galleries in the period 2019-2022. Borchgrevink's acclaimed photographs of man-made nature are both documentary and abstract. The photographs of 300 million-year-old granite formations found deep in Norwegian quarries were nominated for Vestfold and Telemark county's Culture Award 2022, Cyan Folio by Høvikodden and Fotogalleriet 2019 and presented at Nordic Light. The Steinbrudd series sheds light on our common history with a visually updated expression, which gives the public a new awareness of art and cultural history. In 2022, Borchgrevink participated in the Ovasjon development program for artists under the auspices of the Norwegian Culture Council. In 2023, her photo book "Brudd, The Beauty of Stoned Core Material" was presented at Fotobokfestival Oslo under the auspices of CYAN Galleri - Bokkafé. The photo book can be found in the libraries of PREUSmuseum, the National Museum and Deichman Bjørvika. She is a member of the Norwegian Journalist Association NJ, NSFF, TKK. BONUS.
Borchgrevink photographs both people and nature, her main artistic focus in recent years has been landscapes in the Anthropocene era at home and abroad. She has received feedback from a wide audience that her images have a distinctive style that is innovative and beautiful. Borchgrevink's photographs have been purchased to decorate both public companies and private homes.

"My photographs are the result of many years of walking in landscapes and quarries at home and abroad, where I have observed how light changes character depending on the time of day and seasons, in the face of nature, stone and water. I never know what awaits me when I return to a place I have photographed. Is the spectacular scene still there or have we moved even further back in time? Many photographic scenes are already gone, removed industrially, and the pictures I have taken - therefore become unique.
The materiality of the subject is always important, also when the photographs are printed. I photograph both large landscape scenes and sections, it is exciting to work at the intersection of abstraction/symbolic interpretation. When does the abstract become meaningful? When does a language arise that the spectator can make up his mind about? I am excited about materiality and sensation, how much a surface can withstand - and silence."
Quote G. Borchgrevink

Collection: Gerd Borchgrevink